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Register your interest in 2022 Vitality London 10,000
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Choose your training plan

The place to find a 10K training plan to suit you

Looking to take on the Vitality London 10,000? We have training plans to get you through your 10K feeling great from start to finish (with maybe just a bit of tiredness in-between). Whatever your running ability or experience, we have something to suit you...

 

The Run Happy and Healthy Plan

Our Run Happy and Healthy Plan is the perfect training programme if you want to complete a 10K but don’t know where to start!

The plan will help you build up to completing the 10K distance in just 10 weeks. It’s perfect if you’re new to running or looking to target your first 10K event, like the Vitality London 10,000 or the virtual Vitality London 10,000.

As we want you to feel not just healthier but happier in the run-up to the Vitality London 10,000, this plan focuses on your mental, as well as physical, health with tips on how to feel more motivated, beat boredom and celebrate successes big and small. 

The plan will help you build up to completing the 10K distance in just 10 weeks. We’ll be updating the plan for next year’s event, but in the meantime you can check out last year’s plan below for an idea of what you need to do to get 10K ready! 

Our other training plans

If you’d rather do a straightforward beginners programme, or you’ve completed a 10K before or are looking to Celebrate You by pushing yourself a little further, take a look at our other training plans below and download the ones that suit you.

Download training plans

    • Beginner’s six-week plan

      Build enough endurance to run 10K without stopping to walk – that’s the aim anyway!

    • Improver’s six-week plan

      Step up the pace with this plan designed to help you achieve a faster 10K time

    • From zero to 30 minutes in six weeks

      Make sure you can run comfortably for 30 minutes with this plan before you take on any other training

    • Beginner’s six-week plan

      Build enough endurance to run 10K without stopping to walk – that’s the aim anyway!

    • Improver’s six-week plan

      Step up the pace with this plan designed to help you achieve a faster 10K time

    • From zero to 30 minutes in six weeks

      Make sure you can run comfortably for 30 minutes with this plan before you take on any other training

    • Beginner’s six-week plan

      Build enough endurance to run 10K without stopping to walk – that’s the aim anyway!

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Training plan guidelines

The above plans are made up of a variety of sessions. A combination of slow, steady runs, intervals and all-important rest days, should get you in great shape and eager to cross the Start Line – read more about the types of sessions covered below.

  • The ‘fartlek’ sessions in our training plans will offer you the flexibility to run hard when you are feeling strong and to choose how long to spend running more slowly to recover. Aim to run harder for at least 50 per cent of the distance you cover in the session, and vary the length of your recoveries. This type of session is good preparation for the type of variable effort that you will encounter in a long run on an undulating course or in a race.
  • No hill sessions feature in these schedules, but if you’d like to tackle hills, substitute them for one of the hard midweek sessions, such as intervals or fartlek. Limit your hill sessions to one per week. If there are no hills where you live, try increasing the gradient to more than five per cent on a treadmill, if you have access to one. Hill running will build your strength and speed while also improving your confidence.
  • Building endurance is the foundation of successful distance running – speed comes afterwards. The easy runs within the training plans are not only designed to condition your body but also to develop your confidence. Check you are not running too quickly by keeping up a conversation with a friend. If you are struggling to gasp out a reply, then you need to slow down.
  • A rest day means no running rather than no exercise at all. If you want to exercise on rest days, then try doing a non-weight bearing cross-training exercise, such as swimming or cycling.

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